Making & Turning My First Segmented Pen

I wanted to try my hand at segmenting, so I put a segmented blank on a simple Wall Street II kit. This process was a lot of fun, even though messy and nerve racking at times.

I started off camera cutting 1/4″ segments from scraps that were too short to do anything with otherwise. I took the segments and started to glue up each segment by using medium CA. I made sure to use plenty of glue which ensured that the segments bonded well to each other. Unfortunately I was foolish and didn’t put gloves on, so I ended up with CA all over my fingers. Lesson learned. After I glued up the segments and eyeballed that the segments were in some sort of alignment, I put the blank in a clamp and let it sit until it dried.

Once the glue dried, I took it to the drill press and drilled a 27/64″ hole through the middle. Because each segment was a different size, I was nervous that I didn’t glue up the blank straight enough, but once I drilled the hole, I realized I had plenty of meat on the blank and it was fine. I glued the tube into the blank, then trimmed the blank to size and flushed up the blank with the tube.  After I flushed up the blank to the tube, I stayed at the sander and rounded over the blank and tried to flush up the segments to each other. This helped to reduce the chance of blow out and this helped immensely.

After preparing the blank, I took the blank to the lathe and got to turning. I made sure to take light passes and this worked well because I didn’t have any catches or blow outs. It took a little longer to turn, but it was worth it in the end since the blank stayed in one piece and turning went smoothly.

To start the finishing process, I applied a thin coat of CA glue to the blank. This sealed each of the segments, so when I sanded, the different colors of the segments didn’t bleed into each other. This worked really well and I was pleased with the result. Once the CA was applied and cured (with activator), I sanded from 200 grit up to 2,000 grit (dry sanding), then I continued with my finishing process by applying some denatured alcohol to clean up the blank.

I started the finishing process by applying once coat of boiled linseed oil on the blank. When that dried, I put my CA finish on the blank, then wet sanded with micro mesh, going from 1,500 grit up to 12,000 grit. I applied two coats of HUT Ultra Gloss Plastic Polish. This allowed the blank to get a nice shine to it and I was pleased with how the bank looked.

I put this segmented blank on a Wall Street II kit because I wanted to show off the blank and not focus on the kit as much. Assembly of the Wall Street II is super simple, which I cover in the video.

Thanks for reading this article and if you’re interested in checking out the video for this article, be sure to go to the YouTube tab on my website here! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to either email me or comment on the video and I will respond to you!

-Robert

Cherry Navigator Rollerball Pen

Today we continue with the pen series with a Cherry Navigator Rollerball.  This pen is a nice addition to any collection and will look good with just about any blank.

I’m not going to talk about preparing the blank since it’s basically identical to the Metro pen I wrote about in my last post.  I will start by talking about the turning of this pen.  Cherry is plentiful in northeast Ohio, so while it is a common wood, it makes a nice looking pen in my opinion and I enjoy turning cherry.  Cherry turns super easily and I take my time to turn the blanks down to the bushings.

The turning is extremely similar to the Metro, but the main difference is with the Navigator, there is no taper near the top and it has a consistent thickness.  After turning the blanks down to the bushings, I went ahead and sanded the blanks with 220, 400, 1,000, and 2,000 grit sandpaper.  This made the blanks super smooth and available to take a CA finish with no problem.

I cleaned the blanks with some denatured alcohol, then continued with finishing.  I coated the blanks with one coat of boiled linseed oil, then applied my CA finish.  After the CA finish (5 coats of thin), I used micro mesh and wet sanded from 1,500 to 12,000 grit to smooth out any rough spots that might have existed.

After finishing, I was able to assemble the pen with no issues.  As long as you are organized, the Navigator goes together smoothly.  Make sure you have your pieces in order and follow the directions, either through video or written instruction, and this makes for a nice looking pen that has an elegant feel.

Thanks for checking out the video and as always, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to send me a message or comment on the YouTube video that can be found under the “YouTube Videos” tab on my website.

-Robert